Reduction – The Tough Business Times

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Reduction – The Tough Business Times

February 19, 2021 | Business, Hunting | No Comments

A hunter becomes happy to see a good sight after hours of hiding. For hunters, the hunting ground only becomes a complete pleasure when they see wild animals. In the earlier days, the warning finger was lifted when too much had been taken down. At present, environmentalists put a law to put a stop to hunting especially with nature conservationists at the peak of protests to protect and conserve wildlife and the forest.

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Understanding the difficulties of the hunting business

These problems can be identified especially in red deer, roe deer, and wild boar.

  • Red deer prefer pack communities and live on a large scale. If it visits a district in large numbers, it usually leaves traces – in the forest as in the field. The packs cluster together on harvest or driven hunts so that a proper shot is often not feasible. It is also most sensitive to interference.
  • Roe deer, on the other hand, are territorial but can hide very well in a small space. Even with courageous intervention, there is still a surprising amount left over.
  • The adaptable and reproductive wild boars particularly benefit from modern agriculture. Large fields of oilseed rape, grain, or maize have promoted its spread, and the clever sows find shelter in even the smallest hedge.

The Hunting season

Maternity protection is a top priority for skilled hunters and therefore a responsible hunting business is extremely difficult in summer when most of the wild are in maternity. A significant part of the harvest, therefore, falls in late summer and autumn. Then things get tight in the schedule:

The days are getting shorter and shorter for individual hunts, most hunters have the problem of freeing up time for driven hunts in addition to work and family.

New hunting strategies are called for. Increasing the number of driven hunts is certainly not the solution.

Hunters have a Duty

Tradition-conscious hunters will probably be shaken at these considerations. But they can hardly deny at least complicity in the strong growth of the hoofed game populations. That is why they, too, have a duty to contribute to the reduction to a reasonable level. To be clear: Not with the methods and objectives that are propagated by the forestry side. If you want to do it properly and in an animal welfare manner, then it could be a tough and difficult business.

 

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